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20131030
20131030
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
security agency over allegations that despite an european allies and illegally monitored u.s. citizens. diedast 42 people have after their bus caught fire and exploded in southern india. local police say 49 passengers were traveling in the luxury coach which was going overnight from bangalore. we have the latest from delhi. >> it was traveling from bangalore overnight. the accident took place very early in the morning, around 5:00 local time. the driver said he was trying to overtake another vehicle on the highway when his bus hit a divider on the highway after which it burst into flames. you can see in the pictures, the intensity of the flames. is one of the staff members and five other passengers were lucky to escape. they broke a window and got outside. it was set for the rest of the passengers many of whom were asleep at the time and were unable to get out. they were trapped in those flames and they died as a result. there were children among them as well. planes are now popular and trains have been popular but what about the scale of bus travel? bus travel has always been fairly
the nation's top spy chief. the head of the national security agency denied reports of phone tapping of foreign citizens and told house members the nsa would rather take a beating in the media than give up a program that protects americans from terrorists. >> the national security agency says chiefs did not illegally tapped. they revealed rare details of america's intelligence gathering techniques. >> confident and almost defiant top spy chiefs made no apologies before the house intelligence committee. they defended the job the agencies do to keep america and her allies safe. >> there's not been a mass casualty in the u.s. since 2001. that's not by luck. they didn't stop hating us. they didn't say that they were going to just forgive this. they continued to try. >> the work of the national security agency is under fire because of revelations by former nsa analyst, edward snowden. documents he leaked showed phone calls of millions of ordinary citizens. testimony of keith alexander and others told the committee the content is secret in a lock box unless there is a link to terrorism. th
it -- national security agency. on tuesday it provided a platform for the director of national intelens and the head of the nsa to answer critics. james clapper insisted that he was following orders on the bugging of leaders, to give the president the best information possible on his foreign counterparts. >> as long as i have been in the intelligence business, 50 years, leadership intentions, in whatever form it's expressed is kind of a basic tenant of what we are to collect and analyse. >> on recent allegations that the united states was collecting millions of phone records in france and spain, the head of the nsa offered this defense. >> this is not information we collected on european citizens. it represents information that we and our nato allies have collected in defense of our country, and in support of military operations. >> for the last several month, documents that the whistleblower edward snowden leaked showed a dragnet beyond france and spain. it's failed to become a major issue in washington. the bugging of angela merkel's phone received attention because the strategic impl
and the national security agency pushed back. >> one of the first things i learned in intel school in 1963 is that this is the fundamental giveen in the intelligence. >> woodruff: that fundamental according to director of national intelligence james clapper, is learning the intentions of foreign leaders, even if it means spying on allies. what's more, he told today's house hearing it's a two-way street. >> do you believe that the allies have conducted or at any time any type of espionage activity against the united states of america, our intelligence services, our leaders or otherwise? >> absolutely. >> there have been disclosures in recent days that the national security agency eavesdroped on german chancellor angela merkel. the n.s.a.'s director, army general keith al sander the, defended the general practice of surveillance in the u.s. and abroad to prevent terrorist attacks. >> there has not been a mass casualty here in the u.s. since 2001. that's not by luck! they didn't stop hating us. they didn't say that they were going to just forgive this. they continue to try. it is the great me
, deputy attorney general james cole, national security agency director, keith alexander, deputy director of the nsa, chris england. following the first panel, moving immediately into the second panel of nongovernment experts who are very knowledgeable on fisa and privacy issues. today's hearing is an open forum to discuss potential amendments to the foreign intelligence surveillance act and possible changes to the way fisa applications are handled by the department of justice and the nsa. i hope that all of our witnesses will give clear answers about how proposals under consideration in congress would affect the nsa's ability to stop terrorist attacks before they occur. i encourage members to ask questions about fisa amendments and nsa programs, but today i'm going to submit my statement for the record in order to ask some questions following opening statements in relation to some of the news of the day when you get things clarified for the record which is important for the american people. we go about our business and expect a vote. we'll hold as long as we can, take a brief intermissio
examines the nations largest law enforcement agency and asks who is holding them accountable when they pull the trigger. >> people here call this ambos nogales, or both nogales. but a steel fence built in the name of national security divides this border town. i've come to meet jose's family they live just blocks from where jose was killed. >> his brother diego worked at a shop in the center of town. jose would often meet him to help mop the floor before closing. that night, he never made it. jose antonio was shot to death, right on this street corner. the walls on this doctors office are still riddled with bullet holes. now, the border patrol's explanation for what happened hinges on the fact they say their agents were threatened by somebody throwing rocks on this side of the fence. but standing here, the first thing you ask yourself is: could a 16 year old boy really threaten somebody standing on top of what's at least a 20 foot cliff, and on the other side of that fence? whatever took place here that night, there's video cameras right there which recorded everything that happened. but th
the national security agency listened in on angela merkel's private calls. >>> congressional negotiators will try to find a compromise on the budget. house and senate negotiators sitting down today for the first formal negotiations to sign a budget deal before the temporary budget expires on january 15. >> the cardinals are waking up in boston this morning after spending 7 hours on the tarmac in st. louis. a mechanical problems grounded the team's chartered plane and delta airline officials said it took tyke to get a crew and plane that was the right size. tonight is game 6 in the world series. >>> hundreds of people packing a church in santa rosa to mourn the death of 13-year-old andy lopez yesterday. he was killed by a sonoma county sheriff's deputies last week who thought lopez was carrying a real gun but it was a pellet gun. a bill may pass that will require all tower guns to look like toys to make them translucent or colored. >>> about 100 people are searching for a san jose man missing since headed for the sierra to mine for gold. 65-year-old walter steever left on his trip a week
and whenever we found mistakes the court addressed and corrected them. the national security agency's is typically as part of the intelligence community broadly is an honorable institution. the men and women who do this work are honorable people dedicated to conducting the mission lawfully and are appalled by any wrongdoing. they too are citizens of this nation who care just as much about privacy and constitutional rights as the rest of us. they should be commended for their important work in protecting the people of the country which has been made all the more difficult by unauthorized damage of disclosure. that'll safely in the i see stand ready to work to adjust authorities to protect our privacy since civil liberties. i think their principles we already agree on. first must protect our sources targets and relationships and a better job of helping the american people understand what we do and why we do it and most importantly the recursive oversight that insures we do it correctly. third we must take every opportunity to demonstrate a commitment to respond to respecting the civil
of the national security agency says reports of widespread phone tapping overseas are not true. meanwhile, a proposed bill in congress would sale back some of the n.a.a.'s powers. >> confident and almost defiant, the nation's top spy chiefs made no apologies, vigorously defending the job they do to keep america and its allies safe. >> there has not been a mass casualty here in the u.s. since 2001. that's not by luck. they didn't stop hating us. they didn't say that they were going to just forget this. they continued to try. >> the work of the n.s.a. is under fire, because of revelations by former n.s.a. analyst edward snowden. documents he leaked revealed the n.s.a. has been collecting phone calls and text messages of millions of american citizens. the author of the patriot act has proposed a new law called the freedom act aimed at ending the sweeping phone tapping program. the act would stop drag net collection of phone calls of american citizens, place stronger restrictions on who is targeted and appoint a special advocate to the super secret fisa courts to protect privacy rights. natio
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)